Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

ECE Research News

Building More Stable Quadruped Robots: A Dog's Point of View

Research into the gait of dogs may lead to improved design of quadruped robots and how we control their movement. Shai Revzen, a biologist turned roboticist, brings a unique perspective to the study of animals, one thats beginning to be heard by the biological community as well. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

How to Build a BigANT Shai Revzen's Critter-Inspired Robots

Want to build your own robot fast and cheap? Shai Revzen is making that easier with his plate and reinforced flexure (PARF) fabrication technique. He used PARF to develop the meter-scale hexapedal robot known as BigANT, whose design files are available to all. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Revzen, Shai  Robotics  

Transparent silver: Tarnish-proof films for flexible displays, touch screens, metamaterials

The thinnest, smoothest layer of silver that can survive air exposure has been laid down by Prof. Jay Guo, and it could change the way touchscreens and flat or flexible displays are made. It could also help improve computing power, affecting both the transfer of information within a silicon chip and the patterning of the chip itself through metamaterial superlenses. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Flexible electronics  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Cindy Finelli: Community Building And Envisioning The Future Of Engineering Education Research

Prof. Cindy Finelli was highlighted as a pioneer of engineering education for her work in community building and education research. She is part of a new initiative at U-M to include education research in engineering departments. She is also the Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Gopal Nataraj Receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to Support High-impact Research in Medical Imaging

Gopal Nataraj, a doctoral student in Electrical and Computer Engineering, received a U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support his research that promises to lead to improved techniqes in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship is awarded to outstanding doctoral candidates in the final stages of their program whose research is unusually creative, ambitious and impactful. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graduate Students  Lab-Systems  Machine Learning  Medical Imaging  Medical diagnosis  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Michigan's Millimeter-Scale Computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Profs. David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester presented a total of 10 papers at the 2017 IEEE International Solid-State Circuits Conference (ISSCC). Most were related to their Michigan Micro Mote (M3) computers. Their goal is to make smarter, smaller sensors for medical devices and the Internet of Things that can do more with less energy. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Snow science in action

Using high-tech equipment like infrared sensors and low-tech gear like shovels, researchers are trying to determine what remote sensors could best be used on satellites to produce more accurate snowpack measurements around the world. ECE grad student Mohammad Mousavi is working on Grand Mesa with a University of Michigan boom truck parked at the Jumbo Campground by Mesa Lakes and outfitted with a microwave radiometer, one type of snowpack measurement device. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

CASSIE: A Tougher, Lighter Bipedal Robot with Eyes

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

A new two-legged robot is coming to Michigan Engineering: the third generation biped in the lab of Jessy Grizzle, whose previous 'bots have been programmed to walk unassisted over rough terrain and jog a nine-minute mile. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Robotics  

Becky Peterson Receives NSF CAREER Award for Research in Amorphous Semiconductors for Next Generation Electronics

Prof. Becky Peterson was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project entitled Band Engineering in Amorphous Semiconductors." She will develop new alloys of amorphous oxide semiconductors with precisely tuned semiconductor energy band structures in order to enable new categories of electronic and opto-electronic devices. This research is applicable to the next generation of high-power electronics and deep ultraviolet optoelectronic devices, with specific applications in renewable energy and health care. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Optoelectronics  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability  

Kamal Sarabandi | Remote Sensing Science and Technology

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi delivered a Geoscience Remote Sensing Seminar, titled "Remote Sensing Science and Technology in Support of Exploration and Safe Utilization of Energy Resources." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Mark Kushner | The Role of Plasma Modeling

Prof. Mark Kushner delivered the Keynote Address at the 2016 LNF Users Symposium, titled The Role of Plasma Modeling in the Innovation Cycle for Nanofabrication. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Kushner, Mark J.  Plasma Science and Engineering   

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

The Office of Naval Research has awarded Prof. Dmitry Berenson $1.1 million to help advance a robot's ability to walk over unstable ground and deal with tangles in string, rope or wire. One of the new abilities that Berenson and his group will help robots attain is navigating unfamiliar environments by reusing previous experience from similar environments. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Berenson, Dmitry  Robotics  

Video: The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility

The Lurie Nanofabrication Facility is a state-of- the-art cleanroom that provides advanced micro- and nano-fabrication equipment and expertise to internal and external researchers. The LNF enables cutting edge research, including semiconductor materials and devices, electronic circuits, solid-state lighting, energy, biotechnology, medical devices and unconventional materials and processing technologies. Learn more in this video. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  LNF  Lu, Wei  Najafi, Khalil  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  

Ushering in the Next Generation of Flat-Panel Displays and Medical Imagers

Research that is expected to directly impact the future of the flat-panel display and imager industries has been selected as an Editor's Choice by the Journal of Solid-State Electronics. The article, co-authored by Prof. Jerzy Kanicki, ECE graduate student Chumin Zhao, and Dr. Mitsuru Nakata, describes a new technology that may help usher in the next generation of flat-panel displays and imagers. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Displays  Kanicki, Jerzy  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  

Video: Prof. Cindy Finelli and Engineering Education Research

Prof. Finelli is currently Director of Engineering Education Research in the College of Engineering, and she was founding director at the Center for Research on Learning and Teaching in Engineering at Michigan, which supports college-wide initiatives in engineering teaching and learning. Her own research focuses on how faculty make decisions about what theyre doing in the classroom, how students understand engineering concepts, and how a flexible classroom influences both teaching and learning. Watch a new video about her and her work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

Solving the "Christmas light" problem so solar panels can handle shade

Just 10 percent shade cover can create a 50 percent drop in solar panel electricity production. Prof. Al-Thaddeus Avestrus is working to ensure power produced by a solar panel reflects the average over all the cells. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Avestruz, Al-Thaddeus  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  Sustainability  

COVE: A Tool for Advancing Progress in Computer Vision

A new project has been launched to provide open and easy access to up-to-date, varied, data sets, annotations and their relevant tools. Based at the University of Michigan with collaborators at Boston University and the University of Notre Dame, the program aims to centralize available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE. The project promises to have an immediate and far-reaching impact on the computer vision community as well as researchers involved in machine learning, multimedia, natural language processing, data mining, and information retrieval. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Vision  Corso, Jason  Lab-Systems  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new device for studying tumor cells can trap 10,000 individual cells in a single chip. The technique, developed by Prof. Euisik Yoon's group, could one day help screen potential cancer treatments based on an individual patients tumor and help researchers better understand so-called cancer stem cells. It also shed light on a controversy: are large cells or small cells more likely to be cancer stem cells? [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cancer  Health  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Yoon, Euisik  

Hacking Healthcare - How Big Data is Driving Big Changes in Medicine

The article by CoE writer Gabe Cherry highlights the work being done by Jenna Wiens and her collaborators on using big data to predict which hospital patients are at risk of developing a life-threatening intestinal infection called Clostridium difficile, or C. diff. It also provides context on the big data initiatives taking at UM in general and with respect to healthcare, and across EECS, including work by Prof. Barzan Mozafari on how to improve the design of big data databases. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Big Data  Hero, Alfred  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Machine Learning  Michielssen, Eric  Mower Provost, Emily  Mozafari, Barzan  Wiens, Jenna  

Necmiye Ozay Receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded a NASA Early Career Faculty award for her project, "Run-time anomaly detection and mitigation in information-rich cyber-physical systems." Her research will be designed to assist in future missions in space, while being applicable to a wide range of cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Space technology  

Solar power plant: $1.4M grant aims to cut costs

Nanotechnology could reduce the cost of the most expensive part of a solar thermal power plant by roughly 75 percent. The Department of Energy gave a team of researchers at the University of Illinois, the University of Michigan and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory $1.4 million to develop new solar concentrators. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Power and Energy  Solar Cell Technology  

Pioneering Engineering Education Research

A new initiative at the College of Engineering has brought U-M into the spotlight in the field of Engineering Education Research (EER). Spearheaded by Prof. David C. Munson, Jr. while he was Dean, the College took a unique approach to EER by embedding faculty directly into traditional engineering departments. A few other institutions had already developed standalone departments or schools for EER with their own sets of faculty and PhD students, but U-Ms approach is the first of its kind. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Engineering Education Research  Finelli, Cynthia  

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

Since he received a robot capable of walking outside, Jessy Grizzle has heard the siren call of the Wave Field, the undulating earthen art installation outside the Franois-Xavier Bagnoud building. MARLO finally got her shot at it. For now, Jessy and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that Grizzle calls merely very difficult. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

A Bipedal Robot Gets Its Swagger On

Popular Science watches MARLO take a stroll across the wave field for the first time. "She's trained her whole life for this moment: MARLO recently stomped and stumbled her way through a new milestone at University of Michigan's Wave Field. The field an art installation turned robot testing ground offers new challenges for the bipedal robot's lateral and forward balance, because of its uneven terrain." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

MARLO the bipedal robot seems to be tipsy

MARLO has captured worldwide attention again with her exploration of the wave field on North Campus. As she tries to navigate the steep bumps with no sensors, just extraordinarily clever algorithms that have her adapting to what she "steps in," she appears to be, well, a bit drunk. This drunken behavior is just MARLO pushing the extremes of what a human-sized bipedal robot can do. See her on Gizmodo, Aol.On and MSN Video
Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Two Michigan Papers Win Top Awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

Two papers authored by EECS researchers were selected for top honors at the 37th IEEE Symposium on Security and Privacy. One of the papers, describing and demonstrating a malicious hardware backdoor, received the Distinguished Paper Award. The second, which demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform, received the Distinguished Practical Paper Award. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Hicks, Matt  Internet of Things  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Lab-Software Systems  Prakash, Atul  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

A New, Low-Cost Way to Monitor Snow and Ice Thickness to Evaluate Environmental Change

Mohammad Mousavi, PhD student in ECE, earned a Weisnet Medal at the Eastern Snow Conference for his paper Elevation Angular Dependence of Wideband Autocorrelation Radiometric (WiBAR) Remote Sensing of Dry Snowpack and Lake Icepack, co-authored by Dr. Roger De Roo, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi, and Prof. Anthony England. The Weisnet Medal is presented to the best student paper at the conference. Mohammad has developed a new way to remotely measure the thickness of ice and snow with a technology he calls wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR), offering lower cost, lower power, and more flexibility than competing methods. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  England, Anthony W.  Environment  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Remote Sensing  Sarabandi, Kamal  

An Award Winning Radar System for Collision Avoidance and Imaging

Armin Jam, doctoral student in ECE, took first place in the student paper competition at the 2016 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation (AP-S) for his paper, "A Horizontally Polarized Beam-Steerable Antenna for Sub-millimeter-wave Polarimetric Imaging and Collision Avoidance Radars," co-authored by his advisor, Prof. Kamal Sarabandi. Armins research is focused on the development of a sub-millimeter-wave (sub-MMW) radar system for the next generation of navigation and imaging sensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Autonomous Vehicles   Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

A New Way to Test Low-Frequency Antennas for Long-Range Communication

Jihun Choi, a doctoral student in Prof. Kamal Sarabandi's research group, has earned an honorable mention in the 2016 IEEE Symposium on Antennas and Propagation Student Paper Competition. His paper describes a new technique to test antennas for long-range communication applications. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Applied Electromagnetics and RF Circuits  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  

Two Papers by Michigan Researchers Chosen as IEEE Micro Top Picks

Two papers authored by EECS researchers have been selected for IEEE Micro's Top Picks from the 2015 Computer Architecture Conferences. The two papers from Michigan introduced the Sirius personal digital assistant and the MBus bus for modular microcomputing systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Dutta, Prabal  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Mars, Jason  Mudge, Trevor  Tang, Lingjia  

U-M cyber security startup purchased by FICO

QuadMetrics, a cyber risk security startup co-founded by Prof. Mingyan Liu, announced it has been purchased. Analytic software company FICO of San Jose, Calif., bought QuadMetrics to help in its development of a FICO Enterprise Security Score. The scores will rank an organization's level of cyber security risk, the company said in a statement. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Liu, Mingyan  Security (Computing)  Technology Transfer  

Injectable Computers Can Broadcast from Inside the Body

Profs. David Blaauw and David Wenzloff are designing millimeter-scale ultra-low-power sensing systems that can be injected into the body through a syringe. Unlike other radios of this size, these new devices are able to broadcast through the human body to an external receiver. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wentzloff, David  Wireless Communications  

This "Demonically Clever" Backdoor Hides in a Tiny Slice of a Computer Chip

This article in Wired describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates how a hacker could hide a malicious backdoor in silicon and trigger it to gain access to a computing system. Google engineer Yonatan Zunger is quoted as saying "This is the most demonically clever computer security attack Ive seen in years." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Blaauw, David  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  

Undetectable proof-of-concept chip poisoning uses analog circuits to escalate privilege

In this article, Cory Doctorow describes work by Michigan researchers that demonstrates a "novel, frightening attack on the integrity of microprocessors." The paper describes the attack, which is nearly undetectable, and how it can lead to full control of a computing system. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Austin, Todd  Computer Architecture  Graduate Students  Lab-Computer Engineering (CE Lab)  Security (Computing)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program led by Prof. Euisik Yoon will regularly bring together researchers with complementary expertise from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain and diseases that affect it. Yoon has been leading a key development of the Michigan Probe, a revolutionary tiny solid-state microsystem developed at U-M that can be used to probe the inner workings of the brain. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  LEDs  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

MARLO, the free-standing two-legged robot, conquers terrain with innovative control algorithms

MARLO, the free-standing bipedal robot developed by Prof. Jessy Grizzle's group, can now walk down steep slopes, through a thin layer of snow, and over uneven and unstable ground. The robots feedback control algorithms should be able to help other two-legged robots as well as powered prosthetic legs gain similar capabilities. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Control Systems  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Software Systems  Robotics  

Making Memory Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger

As tiny embedded computers spread to every item in the home and beyond - fast, reliable memory is needed on an unheard-of scale. To fuel this ongoing revolution, Prof. Wei Lu and former student Dr. Sung Hyun Jo co-founded the company Crossbar, Inc. to tackle the physical limitations of conventional memory technology. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Embedded Computing and Systems  Entrepreneurship  Internet of Things  LNF  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lu, Wei  Memristor  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Technology Transfer  

Fundamental science will play a key role in finding cancer cure

Prof. David Blaauw is part of a team that NSF recently funded to develop millimeter-sized, ultra-low-power electronic biosensors for implantation in tumors to determine chemotherapy impacts. Monitoring of tumor micro-environments during therapy could inform chemotherapy duration, result in more successful chemotherapy and advance the science of implantable biosensors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Cancer  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

MEMS research to assist in treatment of glaucoma selected as a featured article

The paper, Resonant magnetoelastic microstructures for wireless actuation of liquid flow on 3D surfaces and use in glaucoma drainage implants, by Venkatram Pepakayala, Joshua Stein and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani, was selected as a Featured Article in the journal, Microsystems & Nanoengineering. The researchers created wireless MEMS actuators that facilitate the flow of fluids on the surface of implantable glaucoma drainage devices that help lower eye pressure.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

MEMS Fabrication Research Highlighted by the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering

The paper, A Fabrication Process for the Monolithic Integration of Magnetoelastic Actuators and Silicon Sensors, by Jun Tang, Dr. Scott Green, and Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani has been selected as one of the 2015 Highlights of the Journal of Micromechanics and Microengineering. The researchers achieved a microfabrication process that can be used for specific types of MEMS motors used in wireless sensing systems on a silicon substrate.
Related Topics:  Gianchandani, Yogesh  MEMS and Microsystems  WIMS/WIMS2  

A better 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

A camera that can record 3D images and video is under development, with $1.2 million in funding from the W.M. Keck Foundation. The new technology makes use of the special characteristics of graphene, and is anticipated to have dramatic applications in artificial bionic eyes, industrial imaging, robotic vision, and medical imaging. Leading the research are professors Ted Norris, Zhaohui Zhong, and Jeff Fessler. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Fessler, Jeffrey  Graphene  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Lab-Systems  Medical Imaging  Norris, Theodore B.  Optics and Photonics  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Zhong, Zhaohui  

Power Harvesting Sensor Patch Uses Your Body As a Battery

IEEE Spectrum reported on a sensor patch that can power itself by using thermoelectric materials to turn the temperature difference between your body and the surrounding air into electricity. The project, based at North Caroline State University's Center for Advanced Self-Powered Systems of Integrated Sensors (ASSIST), involves Prof. David Wentzloff, who specializes in integrated circuit design for adaptable wireless communication systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Injectable Radios to Broadcast From Inside the Body

IEEE Spectrum reported on medical devices being developed at Michigan that may one day be small enough to go through a syringe. Professors David Blaauw and David Wentzloff are collaborating with researchers at the U-M medical school to come up with the first test application. These devices will be able to monitor oxygen, glucose, and other biometrics, or follow disease progression in tumors. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Millimeter-scale Computing  Sensors  Wentzloff, David  

Necmiye Ozay Receives CAREER Award for Research in Cyber-Physical Systems

Prof. Necmiye Ozay, assistant professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was awarded an NSF CAREER award for her research project, "A Compositional Approach to Modular Cyber-Physical Control System Design." This research is applicable to a wide variety of safety-critical and autonomous systems, including next generation air vehicles, automotive systems, robotics and smart manufacturing. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cyber-physical systems  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  

Energy researchers receive $1.4 million grant

Researchers from the University, including ECE's Prof. Ian Hiskens, have received a $1.4 million grant from the Department of Energy to help develop data on power system optimization in energy grids. The team will work to develop new test cases to formulate better software algorithms for transmission operators to run the energy grid algorithms which regulate energy amounts. These operators are largely non-profit government agencies. The need for such research stems from the ongoing energy transition from traditional, emission-heavy sources such as coal and nuclear power to cleaner, renewable sources like wind and solar. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Energy Science and Engineering  Environment  Grid  Hiskens, Ian  Lab-Michigan-Power-and-Energy(MPEL)  

What good is Nanotechnology? NBC Learn brings us Jay Guo to find out

How could something only billionths of a meter thick defend against water, dirt, wear, and even bacteria? Working at the nanoscale, scientists and engineers, like Jay Guo are creating protective nanoscale coatings and layers. These surfaces have applications in energy, electronics, medicine, and could even be used to make a plane invisible. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

Somin Lee Receives AFOSR Young Investigator Award for Research in Bioplasmonics

Prof. Somin Eunice Lee received a Young Investigator Award from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to support research that will ultimately help our basic understanding of how tissues form distinct shapes and structure to become organs, such as lungs, salivary glands, and mammary glands. This understanding will facilitate new strategies to engineer replacement tissues. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Health  Lab-Optics and Photonics  Lee, Somin E.  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

How someday robots may run to the rescue -- literally

Prof. Jessy Grizzle Grizzle, along with a group of robotics engineers and students at U-M, is not only working to develop algorithms -- self-contained, step-by-step operations -- to be performed by walking robots, he's working to revolutionize them. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Grizzle, Jessy  Lab-Systems  Robotics  

Mapping the brain: Probes with tiny LEDs shed light on neural pathways

With the help of light-emitting diodes as small as neurons, University of Michigan researchers are unlocking the secrets of neural pathways in the brain. The researchers have built and tested in mice neural probes that hold what are believed to be the smallest implantable LEDs ever made. The new probes can control and record the activity of many individual neurons, measuring how changes in the activity of a single neuron can affect its neighbors. The team anticipates that experiments using probes based on their design could lead to breakthroughs in understanding and treating neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Brain  Health  International Prog. for the Adv. of Neurotechnology  Ku, Pei-Cheng (P.C.)  Lab-Solid State Electronics (SSEL)  Yoon, Euisik  

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