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EECS News

Deciphering GPS satellites to see inside hurricanes

Researchers, including graduate student Tianlin Wang, are reverse engineering the signal from the same GPS satellites that provide location capabilities to our phones and cars in order to more accurately determine wind speeds within roaring hurricanes. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Graduate Students  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sensing and Sensors  Signal & Image Processing and Machine Learning  Space technology  

Intel's SGX blown wide open by, you guessed it, a speculative execution attack

ARS Technica reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Software Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Spectre-Like Flaw Undermines Intel Processors' Most Secure Element

Wired reports on the security work done by Michigan CSE researchers and their collaborators on a flaw in what was supposed to be a secure enclave in Intel chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Software Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

A newly discovered processor vulnerability could potentially put secure information at risk in any Intel-based PC manufactured since 2008. It could affect users who rely on a digital lockbox feature known as Intel Software Guard Extensions, or SGX, as well as those who utilize common cloud-based services. CSE researchers contributed to the discovery of the security hole, called Foreshadow. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Genkin, Daniel  Graduate Students  Kasikci, Baris  Lab-Software Systems  Wenisch, Thomas  

Hackers are out to jeopardize your vote

Cyberattacks on the 2016 US election caused states to bolster the defenses of their voting systems. Prof. J Alex Halderman explains why this hasn't been enough in this Q&A piece. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Is Blockchain Technology the Future of Voting?

West Virginia is experimenting with voting via a blockchain network using smartphones. Prof. J. Alex Halderman cautions that such an approach is not yet truly viable, and that mobile voting using blockchain doesn't address core security problems that are unique to mobile voting. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Heartland Tech Weekly: How Duo Security built a $2.35 billion company in Ann Arbor

Venture Beat reports on Ann Arbor unicorn Duo Security's sale to Cisco. It quotes company cofounder Dug Son (CS BS 1997) on why he and cofounder Jon Oberheide (CSE PhD 2011) made the sale, the future for Duo, and the impact expected for the Ann Arbor tech scene. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Sounding the Alarm on the Dangers of Electronic Voting

Prof. J. Alex Halderman explains the dangers inherent with electronic voting machines, especially those without paperbackup, in the BloombergTV interview with Emily Chang. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Michigan Data Science Team wrangles big data

The Michigan Data Science Team brings together students from many fields to get their hands dirty with real data science problems and tools. The team gives members a place to learn from experts, form groups to tackle data science challenges, and do research that matches their interests. In the 2018-19 school year, Computer Science and Data Science undergrad Wesley Tian will be leading the organization as president, with plans to focus the groups activities and provide a better learning experience for new members. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Graduate Students  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Cisco is buying Duo Security for $2.35B in cash

Cisco today announced its intention to buy Ann Arbor, MI-based security firm, Duo Security. Under the terms of the agreement, Cisco is paying $2.35 billion in cash and assumed equity awards for Duo. Duo Security was founded in 2010 by Dug Song (BS CS ) and Jonathan Oberheide (BS, MS, PhD CSE , , ) and went on to raise $121.M through several rounds of funding. The company has 700 employees with offices throughout the United States and in London, though the company has remained headquartered in Ann Arbor. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Cybersecurity  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  

Blue Sky and Research Accelerator Initiatives fund solar fuel and high-power research

Zetian Mi leads a Blue Sky Initiative to contribute to clean water and renewable fuel, while Becky Peterson leads an effort to improve how we manufacture the electronics needed for high-power devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Mi, Zetian  Peterson, Becky (R. L.)  Power and Energy  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  Sustainability and Environment  

Rick Flores leads a partnership of automakers into the autonomous future

When Rick Flores (MSE Electrical Engineering:Systems 1990) began his career at General Motors, it was still predominantly a mechanical engineering company. Now, he's taking the lead to develop standards for autonomous and connected vehicles with the largest automaker partnership in the world. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Automotive industry  

Voting systems in Wisconsin, a key swing state, can be hacked, security experts warn

This article at WisconsinWatch.org reports in detail on potential vulnerabilities in Wisconsin's voting system, including risks from Russian hacking. It reviews the response of Wisconsin politicians to this prospect as well as the viewpoints of computer scientists. Prof. J. Alex Halderman, an expert in computer, network, and election security, is highlighted in the story. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

Memory-processing unit (MPU) could bring memristors to the masses

AI, weather forecasting and data science would all benefit from computers that store and process data in the same place. Professor Wei Lu is working on memristors that could be up to the task. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Electronic devices  Lu, Wei  Memristor  

People are bad at spotting fake news. Can computer programs do better?

This article is a survey of the many projects dedicated to using computing power to identify fake news. It includes a description of work being done at Michigan by Veronica Perez-Rosas and her colleagues on the use of language in the posts regarding fake news. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Perez-Rosas, Veronica  

Using software to beat Moore's Law: $9.5M to design the reconfigurable computer

In search of a new way to overcome the limitations of silicon, Prof. Ron Dreslinski is leading a project with a $9.5million DARPA grant to develop a hardware architecture and software ecosystem that together can approach the power of ASICs with the flexibility of a CPU. Called Transmuter, this software-defined hardware can change how programs use the hardware available to them in real time, effectively acting as a reconfigurable computer. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Computer Architecture  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  

A new hybrid chip that can change its own wiring

As part of a national effort to advance electronics technology, Hun-Seok Kim, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, will lead a $5.2 million project to develop a new type of system-on-chip (SoC) that mixes together the adaptability of general purpose processors with the efficiency of specialized processors, allowing for demanding applications such as highly intelligent wireless communication systems used in radar and swarms of autonomous devices. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Kim, Hun-Seok  Mudge, Trevor  

Enabling anyone to design hardware with a new open-source tool

In a $6.5 million U-M-led project that could revolutionize and democratize designing hardware devices, Professors Wentzloff, Blaauw, Dreslinski, and Sylvester will work to create an open-source hardware compiler that aims to reduce the six month process of hand-designing analog circuits to a dramatically faster and automated 24-hour routine. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  Wentzloff, David  

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

Professors Sylvester, Blaauw, and Dreslinski will test tools and provide feedback in a national program that aims to build free, open-source electronic design automation tools. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Computer-Aided Design & VLSI  Dreslinski, Ron  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Sylvester, Dennis  

Fall 2018: Computational Modeling in Human-Computer Interaction

Course No.: EECS 598-011
Credit Hours: 3 credits
Instructor: Nikola Banovic
Prerequisites: Programming experience in Java, Python, MATLAB or R

Course Description:
This seminar course will review current computational approaches to describe, simulate, and predict human behavior from empirical behavior traces data. It will contrast computational modeling with other methodologies to understand human behavior and compare computational modeling with existing behavior modeling methodologies in HumanFComputer Interaction (HCI). Short assignments will give students exposure to some of the cuttingFedge methods, while the final project will give them an opportunity to push the boundaries of computational modeling in HCI by modeling behaviors of their choice from an existing data set.
[More Info]

Making education accessible in rural India

CS student Divyansh Sharma is working to help combat the disadvantages of poverty in rural India with his non-profit startup EduTech Academy. Through EduTech, he and his team of ten developers are working to deliver free video courses directly to people in need of basic education. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Education  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Undergraduate Students  

Student org brings investors to Michigan

A new student org at the University of Michigan wants to build new connections for the startups in southeast Michigan and give undergrads a look into the world of venture capital along the way. Called UpRound VC and co-founded by CS undergrad Jonah Erlich, the group works with national and local firms to accelerate the entrepreneurial ecosystem of the region. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Four students earn awards at 2018 IEEE APS/URSI

Four University of Michigan graduate students won Honorable Mentions at the 2018 IEEE International Symposium on Antennas and Propagation and USNC-URSI Radio Science Meeting. This is the flagship conference for those researching antenna, propagation, and radio sciences, with over 2,000 authors presenting their work. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Antennas  Graduate Students  Grbic, Anthony  Lab-Radiation (RADLAB)  Sarabandi, Kamal  Sensing and Sensors  Tsang, Leung  Wireless Systems  

Piston Group Leader Amit Singhi's Four-Point Play to Life

Amit Singhi shifted from engineering into business, but the technical chops from his engineering studies echo through his career. Today, Singhi is Chief Operating & Financial Officer of Piston Group, one of the largest minority-owned automotive suppliers in the country with annual revenues topping $2B. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  Automotive industry  

Marvell Technology Completes Acquisition of Cavium

Cavium was founded by ECE alumnus Syed Ali. Ali will continue as a member of Marvell's Board of Directors [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Safety in Numbers: Computer Scientist Races to Develop Unhackable Code to Protect Everyones Data

ECE alumnus Kurt Rohloff is co-founder of the cybersecurity start-up, Duality Technologies, and director of the NJIT Cybersecurity Research Center. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  

The 5 States Most Vulnerable to a 2018 Election Hack

13 states are still using some electronic voting systems without paper backup. Five states rely upon them exclusively. According to Prof. J. Alex Halderman, "If a sophisticated nation state wants to cause chaos on Election Day, theyre probably already in our systems." [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Halderman, J. Alex  Lab-Software Systems  

University of Michigan to launch new website to help people navigate social media

EECS alumnus Garlin Gilchrist, executive director of the UM Center for Social Media Responsibility, says "it's time to reclaim your space." This is the message behind the center's new Social Integrity website, which is intended to help people to better navigate social media platforms. The site launched June 30. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Michigan's first Science Olympiad invitational for students, by students

This year, the University of Michigan offered the state's first Science Olympiad invitational competition run by Olympiad alumni. Conceived of and organized in part by CS freshman Omar Al-Ejel, the inaugural U-M Science Olympiad gave 45 high school student teams a place to hone their craft and prep for the core competition. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Prof. Jason Corso on Artificial Intelligence

Prof. Jason Corso covers the basics of artificial intelligence (AI) in an interview by Online Engineering Programs. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Artificial Intelligence  Corso, Jason  

Rick Bergman sees that Synaptics stays in touch

ECE alumnus Rick Bergman, CEO of Synaptics, talked to The Mercury News about Synaptics and its evolution into other areas beyond physical touchpads. "At the end of the day, what we like to do is make devices easier to use," said Bergman. Synaptics products are used by Apple, HP, Lenovo, and Samsung, among others. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

World's tiniest 'computer' makes a grain of rice seem massive

It could lead to big changes in health monitoring, writes Jon Fingas on engadget. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sensing and Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

The Smallest Computer in the World Fits On a Grain of Rice

The University of Michigan just defeated IBM in creating this tiny computing device, writes Laura Yan of Popular Mechanics. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sensing and Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

The World's Smallest Computer Can Fit on the Tip of a Grain of Rice

The University of Michigan was salty that IBM made a smaller computer than it did, so it made an even smaller computer, writes Kaleigh Rogers of Motherboard. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sylvester, Dennis  

Tool for structuring data creates efficiency for data scientists

Transforming messy data into a usable state turns out to be labor-intensive and tedious. Traditionally, domain experts handwrite task-specific scripts to transform unstructured data. Enter Foofah, a project developed by CSE graduate students Zhongjun Jin and Michael Anderson, Prof. Michael Cafarella, and Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science H.V. Jagadish that can help to minimize the effort and required background knowledge needed to clean up data. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Cafarella, Michael  Data and Computing  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  

Exploring the source of social stereotypes

Incoming CSE PhD student Wilka Carvalho has been selected for the GEM Fellowship under the sponsorship of Adobe. Carvalho plans to work with Profs. Satinder Singh Baveja, Honglak Lee, and Richard Lewis (Psychology) to pursue research at the intersection of reinforcement learning, machine learning, and computational cognitive science. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Baveja, Satinder Singh  Brain  Graduate Students  Lee, Honglak  Machine Learning  

Mars Rover Team tackles major redesign, places in top 10 at competition

The U-M Mars Rover Team brought a new remote astronaut assistant to the University Rover Challenge in the desert of southern Utah, pulling off a 9th place finish out of 36 competing international teams and 3rd out of the US teams. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

M-Fly's season ends with top-10 finishes, new autonomous plane

The M-Fly student aircraft design team provides undergraduates the opportunity to design, build, present, and test real-world aerospace projects. This year was extremely productive, with the team building more planes than ever, including its first autonomous craft. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Student Teams and Organizations  Undergraduate Students  

Party for the people: UpNext app lets users shape the playlist

Tired of yelling song requests at the DJ until youre hoarse, and then getting shut down anyway? Turns out a lot of people are, so three U-M students are working to empower party-goers and democratize the dancefloor with their app, UpNext. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Entrepreneurship and Tech Transfer  Mobile Computing  Undergraduate Students  

Finding meaning in varied data

CSE grad student Jie Song earned the runner up Best Paper Award at the 2018 Extending Database Technology conference for her paper GeoAlign: Interpolating Aggregates over Unaligned Partitions. Song devised a method to combine summarized datasets that group information by incompatible units. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Big Data  Graduate Students  Jagadish, HV  Koutra, Danai  

New one-credit course allows those without experience to discover computer science

Interested in Computer Science? Heard about programming but not really sure how it works? A new 1 credit course, EECS 198, will take on these questions and more beginning Fall 2018. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Graduate Students  Mihalcea, Rada  Undergraduate Students  

Hun-Seok Kim receives DARPA Young Faculty Award to advance research in IoT networks

Kim's research is expected to impact the future design and wireless operation of the next generation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices, which includes intelligent control of devices such as drones and self-driving cars. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Kim, Hun-Seok  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  Wireless Systems  

Necmiye Ozay receives 2019 Henry Russel Award for extraordinary accomplishment

Necmiye Ozay, who joined the university in 2013, is a world leader in the field of feedback control engineering for dynamical systems. An innovative engineer, she has developed novel techniques to model, design and test cyber-physical systems. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Lab-Systems  Ozay, Necmiye  Robotics and Autonomous Systems  

May Mobility Is Deploying Self-Driving Vehicles Now, Starting In Detroit

May Mobility, the autonomous shuttle service co-founded by Prof. Edwin Olson, is deploying low speed autonomous electric shuttles on the streets of downtown Detroit. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Autonomous Vehicles  Lab-Artificial Intelligence  Olson, Edwin  

An even smaller world's smallest computer

The Michigan team behind the original Michigan Micro Mote, the world's smallest computer, has gone even smaller, with a device that measures just 0.3 mm to a side -- dwarfed by a grain of rice. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Blaauw, David  Health and Safety  Integrated Circuits and VLSI  Internet of Things  Lab-Michigan Integrated Circuits (MICL)  MEMS and Microsystems  Millimeter-scale Computing  Phillips, Jamie D.  Sensing and Sensors  Sylvester, Dennis  

Q&A with Mingyan Liu

Mingyan Liu, the incoming electrical and computer engineering chair, talks about her vision for the future. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  

Mingyan Liu named new chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan

Mingyan Liu, professor and entrepreneur specializing in communication networks and predictive analytics, has been named the Peter and Evelyn Fuss Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE), effective September 1, 2018. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Liu, Mingyan  

Ben Barton (1925 - 2017): In Memoriam

Ben F. Barton, alumnus and professor emeritus in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, passed away December 16, 2017 at the age of 92. Professor Barton earned his B.S. degree in 1947, his M.S. degree in 1952, and his PhD degree in 1957, all in electrical engineering from the University of Michigan. He retired as emeritus professor of EECS in 1993 after a career of 36 years at Michigan. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Alumni  

Undocumented immigrants' privacy at risk online, on phones

Every day, undocumented immigrants in the U.S. face discrimination, surveillance, deportation, and other dangers. When it comes to their smartphones, immigrants struggle to apply instinctive caution, according to a study by a team of University of Michigan researchers that included CSE PhD student Allison McDonald. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Cybersecurity  Graduate Students  Halderman, J. Alex  

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

L. Jay Guo and his team are applying color-coding to particles that are about the size of color itself, allowing scientists to quickly determine the size of nanoparticles, which can help in biomedical drug delivery, biological sensors, advanced coatings, and lithography of more advanced computer chips. [Full Story]

Related Topics:  Guo, L. Jay  Optics and Photonics  Solid-State Devices and Nanotechnology  

All EECS News for 2018